r/technology – Remember the ‘deepfake cheerleader mom’? Prosecutors now admit they can’t prove fake-video claims.


A lil content nug from that article:

“Three digital-forensic experts to whom The Post showed the broadcast video in recent weeks said it was “highly unlikely” to be a deepfake and appeared “blatantly authentic.” But they also noted that the poor video quality and the lack of other evidence made it impossible to draw any firm conclusions. They did, however, raise one possible explanation: With deepfakes increasingly capturing public attention, they are also more likely to become scapegoats for real offenses caught on camera. The law professors Danielle Citron and Robert Chesney coined the phrase “liar’s dividend” in 2018 to describe this concept, saying deepfakes could make it easier for people “to avoid accountability for things that are in fact true.”

“This may very well be an interesting case of ‘That’s not me, that’s a deepfake,’” Hany Farid, a University of California at Berkeley professor who specializes in visual analysis, told The Post last month.

“From a basic analysis, it was very obvious,” Ajder added. “But this case is a portent of things to come as deepfakes become more sophisticated and more realistic. It may not be so easy to make that distinction going forward. And in that situation, your everyday police officer isn’t going to be able to tell the difference.”

And on a related note:

https://www.engadget.com/deepfake-detectors-can-be-duped-083601148.html


A lil content nug from that article:

“Three digital-forensic experts to whom The Post showed the broadcast video in recent weeks said it was “highly unlikely” to be a deepfake and appeared “blatantly authentic.” But they also noted that the poor video quality and the lack of other evidence made it impossible to draw any firm conclusions. They did, however, raise one possible explanation: With deepfakes increasingly capturing public attention, they are also more likely to become scapegoats for real offenses caught on camera. The law professors Danielle Citron and Robert Chesney coined the phrase “liar’s dividend” in 2018 to describe this concept, saying deepfakes could make it easier for people “to avoid accountability for things that are in fact true.”

“This may very well be an interesting case of ‘That’s not me, that’s a deepfake,’” Hany Farid, a University of California at Berkeley professor who specializes in visual analysis, told The Post last month.

“From a basic analysis, it was very obvious,” Ajder added. “But this case is a portent of things to come as deepfakes become more sophisticated and more realistic. It may not be so easy to make that distinction going forward. And in that situation, your everyday police officer isn’t going to be able to tell the difference.”

And on a related note:

https://www.engadget.com/deepfake-detectors-can-be-duped-083601148.html

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *