r/technology – Congress unveils bills to dismantle tech giants


Devil is in the details and the unintended consequences. While its interesting to see some semblance of bipartisan support here, its hard to feel encouraged that these bills will do anything more than make sound bytes and talking points that ultimately go nowhere.

The Bills (from the article):

1 . The American Innovation and Choice Online Act, lead by Cicilline and Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Tex.), is meant to prevent dominant companies from unfairly disadvantaging rivals, such as preventing smaller companies from establishing their own prices for goods and services.

  • This bill, also supported by Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado, lead Republican on the House Judiciary Antitrust subcommittee, and Jerry Nadler (D-NY) would make it difficult for Apple and Android to set prices and policies for their app stores that rivals have complained make them lose business and revenue.

2 . The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act, lead by Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), bans major online players from buying competitive threats. The bill is also supported by Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Buck and Gooden.

3 . The Ending Platform Monopolies Act, lead by Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash) and supported by Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Gooden and Buck, could break up Amazon by making it illegal for the company to both own the platform and offer competing services on it.

4 . The Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching (ACCESS) Act, lead by Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-Pa), and supported Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Buck and Burgess Owens (R-OH) is meant to increase competition by forcing companies to give consumers the ability to switch data between platforms.

5 . The Merger Filing Fee Modernization Act, lead by Rep. Joe Neguse (D-Co) and supported by Rep. Buck along with Rep. Victoria Spartz (R-IN) and Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX), would give enforcement agencies more teeth and resources by requiring higher fees for mergers valued at $1 billion and more.

We’ll see what happens, but I’ll be surprised if any real change comes to the online ecosystem.


Devil is in the details and the unintended consequences. While its interesting to see some semblance of bipartisan support here, its hard to feel encouraged that these bills will do anything more than make sound bytes and talking points that ultimately go nowhere.

The Bills (from the article):

1 . The American Innovation and Choice Online Act, lead by Cicilline and Rep. Lance Gooden (R-Tex.), is meant to prevent dominant companies from unfairly disadvantaging rivals, such as preventing smaller companies from establishing their own prices for goods and services.

  • This bill, also supported by Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado, lead Republican on the House Judiciary Antitrust subcommittee, and Jerry Nadler (D-NY) would make it difficult for Apple and Android to set prices and policies for their app stores that rivals have complained make them lose business and revenue.

2 . The Platform Competition and Opportunity Act, lead by Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), bans major online players from buying competitive threats. The bill is also supported by Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Buck and Gooden.

3 . The Ending Platform Monopolies Act, lead by Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash) and supported by Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Gooden and Buck, could break up Amazon by making it illegal for the company to both own the platform and offer competing services on it.

4 . The Augmenting Compatibility and Competition by Enabling Service Switching (ACCESS) Act, lead by Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon (D-Pa), and supported Reps. Cicilline, Nadler, Buck and Burgess Owens (R-OH) is meant to increase competition by forcing companies to give consumers the ability to switch data between platforms.

5 . The Merger Filing Fee Modernization Act, lead by Rep. Joe Neguse (D-Co) and supported by Rep. Buck along with Rep. Victoria Spartz (R-IN) and Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX), would give enforcement agencies more teeth and resources by requiring higher fees for mergers valued at $1 billion and more.

We’ll see what happens, but I’ll be surprised if any real change comes to the online ecosystem.

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